Premiere Vision Leather review inspires fashion

France
Published:  07 November, 2016

The Paris based trade event for premium leathers seeks to inspire fashion designers by highlighting the most cutting-edge products from a selection of exhibitors that were present at the September 2016 edition of the show.

Keen to offer its visitors new products with which to inspire their collections, as well as with technical innovations that provide solutions for improving production and the characteristics of their leather items, Premiere Vision Leather (PVL) has highlighted ten innovations showcased in the Autumn/Winter edition.

From new textures and unusual appearances, the leather professionals exhibiting at PVL have been working on perfecting, or even transforming the material touch. For instance, by buffing and feeding Karung leather with fish oil at the end of the production process, Cuir de Lagny radically transformed this product that is generally much less supple and much drier, while the ostrich leather from Italhide has been thinned to 0.6 mm and nourished with oils and fats with very low specific gravities, achieving a degree of softness and lightness making it ideal for clothing.

The unusual or unsettling material appearances are also put forward with Portuguese tanner Inducol, which transformed a simple merino lamb shearling into a strange astrakhan. On the constant quest for innovation, Italian tanner Bopell combined laser-perforated and washed sheep leather with a lamé textile, while the insertion of sequins between goat leather and a film of snakeskin scales are illustrated with Amaltea by Ingropelli.

According to PVL, the increasing demand for smooth, chic appearances is driving tanneries to produce leathers with soft and uniform surfaces. In this respect, by using pressing, polishing and stacking techniques, Siddiq Leather Works tightens the grain of cow leather until it becomes as smooth and lustrous as calf leather.

The practical aspects of today’s modern living are also highlighted with the sheep leather from Giorgio Portolano Pelli, which conducts electricity as a result of a product sprayed onto it during the finishing stages, calls can now be taken in all weathers, meaning the end consumer no longer needs to take gloves off to answer a call on the mobile phone.

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