Comprehensive report on leather supply chain traceability

Worldwide
Published:  04 May, 2017

High Street retailers and major brands are facing ever increasing demands from consumers and NGO’s about where products come from and under what conditions they are manufactured. Brands and retailers, especially in the high-end luxury segment, face serious problems with fake or counterfeit products and need to make sure that any leather products made from exotic species are all sourced legally and meet CITES rules. 

In recent years, human rights and environmental NGO’s (Non-Governmental Organisations) as well as animal welfare campaign groups have attacked the leather industry for perceived violations in working conditions, environmental controls and its association with poor animal welfare practices. To counter these threats and to show greater transparency in the leather supply chain responsible leather makers, brands and retailers have sought to introduce traceability into their supply chains. 
A comprehensive online report is now available to purchase covering eight chapters featuring the most up-to-date information relating to traceability in the leather supply chain from the farm through to the finished leather product. The report exclusively available on theSauerReport website covers the seven drivers of traceability which have been identified in this and reports from other industries where the ability to track products transparently through the supply chain is required. The report looks at what traceability and tracking really means in a practical sense and explores the need for traceability in the first place. The report authors have researched existing papers and publications and extracted the findings and best practice from other industries. 

Complex supply chain
In a globalised world, the leather supply chain is very complex. Hides and skins are shipped and traded all over the world and during the leather making process they can be bought and sold, graded and mixed with several other batches and sources along the way. The leather making process also uses many physical-chemical processes which makes monitoring each hide or skin a challenge. Being able to track materials through the process is a major challenge but it is one where some progress has been made in recent years and the report brings together an overview of some of the latest techniques employed in the industry to improve traceability and features some real-life case studies. 
For more information on the Traceability in the Leather Supply Chain report or to purchase please contact Maria Wallace by phone on +44 (0) 203 735 6537 or email: maria@edifydigitalmedia.com 

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