Former Greenpeace executive joins Marfrig’s sustainability committee

Brazil
Published:  23 June, 2020

Marcelo Furtado, former Executive Director of Greenpeace Brazil, is the new member of the Brazilian meatpacker’s sustainability committee.

Holding a degree in chemical engineering and a Master's degree in renewable energy, Marcelo Furtado is a founding partner of ZScore, an interactive platform that offers traceability solutions of environmental assets using blockchain technology, and Chairman of the Board of the World Resources Institute Brasil (WRI), a global research institute that focus on cities, forests and climate. He is also a member of the Board of Conectas, an NGO focussed on human rights, as well of the sustainability Board of Duratex, the eighth largest producer of wood panels in the world.

"For Marfrig, it is a huge privilege to have the experience and knowledge of Marcelo Furtado", said Marcos Molina dos Santos, Founder and President of the company's Board of Directors. "We are convinced that he will contribute decisively to reinforce Marfrig's current position as a benchmark in terms of sustainability”. Furtado is considered an important reference for the defence of the environment in Brazil. From 2008 to 2013, he acted as Executive Director for Greenpeace Brazil. He is also a founding member of the Brazil Climate Forest and Agriculture Coalition, a multi-stakeholder forum with representatives from academia, the private sector and civil society to promote a sustainable, inclusive and low-carbon economy.

His appointment follows recent accusations by Greenpeace that Brazilian meatpackers JBS, Marfrig and Minerva purchased thousands of cattle linked to deforestation of the Amazon rainforest since 2018. Responding to Reuters about the allegations, JBS, Minerva and Marfrig said in statements that they have committed not to buy cattle from illegally deforested areas or farms under environmental embargo since 2009. According to data published by space research agency INPE in 2016, livestock pastures occupy roughly 60% of the deforested area of the Amazon.